citation

"Health Security in a Disordered World." CSIS Commission on Strengthening America's Health Security, Center for Strategic and International Studies, August 08, 2018. Accessed November 05, 2018. https://healthsecurity.csis.org/events/health-security-in-a-disordered-world/

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In today’s world, chronic wars and unstable and fragile states have proliferated, giving rise to over 65 million refugees and displaced persons. This has brought forward ever more urgent needs to detect and control disease outbreaks, ensure reproductive, maternal, and child health services, sustain immunizations, and protect against violence. How is the United States to lead in meeting these critical health security needs?

On Monday, August 6, 2018, from 10:30am-12:30pm PT at the University of Washington, the CSIS Commission on Strengthening America’s Health Security hosted a public event on U.S. leadership in meeting the burgeoning health needs of vulnerable populations living in the midst of conflict and disorder. The event was held in collaboration with the University of Washington Department of Global Health, PATH, the Washington Global Health Alliance, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Mark Richards, University of Washington Provost, offered welcome remarks. Steve Morrison then provided opening remarks. Commissioner Senator Patty Murray, senior Democratic senator from the state of Washington, gave the keynote address. An expert panel discussion followed, featuring Commissioners Margaret “Peggy” Hamburg, Foreign Secretary of the National Academy of Medicine, and Steve Davis, President and CEO of PATH, as well as Scott Dowell, Deputy Director for Surveillance and Epidemiology at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Beth Bell, Clinical Professor in the University of Washington Department of Global Health, and Pamela Collins, Professor in the University of Washington Departments of Global Health and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Commissioner Ambassador Jimmy Kolker, former Assistant Secretary for Global Affairs at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, moderated the panel.